Coda

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coda [ˈkoːda] noun

 “In music, a coda is a passage that brings a piece (or a movement) to an end. Technically, it is an expanded cadence. It may be as simple as a few measures, or as complex as an entire section.”

 Oxford Dictionary of English

 

MEANDER (Spiegel im Spiegel im Spiegel) Timber and mirrored Perspex, 88 x 44 x 396 cm. Gabor Stark, 2018

 

As a coda to my artist residency for the ‘Art in Park: Kearsney interpreted’ project, I installed the MEANDER sculpture at Kearsney Abbey for a last time. Thanks again to everybody who came along to the Meanderings event in August. Here some excerpts from the visitor feedback we received in response to the question ‘What was the best thing about the event?’

“How we could just turn up and discover the art and the music in this beautiful setting, and how Gabor Stark responded to the river and used it so well. // Lovely relaxing atmosphere, beautiful music and fantastic artwork. // Excellent balance of sunlight, trees and music and artwork too! // The atmosphere with arts and music immersed in the park. // Live music in a pastoral setting was magical. Brilliant sculpture worked well in park. // All of it. The synergy between all parts. // The Meanderings event had beauty of many varieties. // Hearing innovative music in a beautiful setting. Please keep up Art in the Park. // The trees. // All of it – the music, surroundings and sculpture. // Combination of music, art and the gorgeous setting. / Combination. // The atmosphere under the tree with the light and music. // Leon String Quartet’s performance. // Melding of art, music, surroundings and Lux Aurumque. // Location, artists, all brilliant. // The music, art and sunshine. // Fantastic event. // The curation, location, installation with orchestra. // Atmosphere and environment // The place.” 

 

Art in the Park: Kearsney interpreted

Project Partners: Kearsney Parks // Dover District Council // DAD Dover Arts Development

Funded by: Arts Council England & Heritage Lottery Fund

 

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Sound & Vision / Art & Music at Kearsney Abbey

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MEANDERINGS – Art & Music in the Park

On Saturday 25 August, nearly one hundred visitors came along to enjoy an afternoon of art and music at Kearsney Abbey in Dover. As part of my Art in the Park: Kearsney interpreted artist residency, I had placed my site-specific sculpture MEANDER (Spiegel im Spiegel im Spiegel) in one of the open sections of the culvert that meanders through the park, and the Leon String Quartet performed around the installation.

The four movements of Philip Glass’s second string quartet Company were followed by an Indian raga and the premiere of Matthew Brown’s Meanderings, a composition inspired by my installation and written exclusively for the event. For the fourth and final piece of the concert, Kammy Pike and Karen Jolliffe (violins), Julie Peat (cello) and Matthew Brown (viola) positioned themselves in front of the four mirrors of the MEANDER installation to perform Eric Whitacre’s Lux Aurumque. The title translates as ‘light and gold’ and is a fitting description of the very special and quite magical atmosphere of the event.

 

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MEANDER (Spiegel im Spiegel im Spiegel) Gabor Stark

MEANDER (Spiegel im Spiegel im Spiegel) Timber and mirrored Perspex, 88 x 44 x 396 cm. Gabor Stark, 2018

Thanks to Daniel Stilwell and Sophie Aunger for helping with the construction and the setting-up; to Kate Beaugié, Helen Lindon and Joanna Jones for the film and sound recordings; to Peppy Cheng and Ming-Han Yeh for the additional photography, to Anita Sedgewick, DDC Community Engagement Officer at Kearney Parks, for her continuous support of the project; to Clare Smith and Joanna Jones from DAD for re-inviting me to do another project in Dover; and to Matthew Brown and the Leon String Quartet for the truly wonderful music.

 

Art in the Park: Kearsney interpreted

Project Partners: Kearsney Parks // Dover District Council // DAD Dover Arts Development

Funded by: Arts Council England & Heritage Lottery Fund

 

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MEANDERINGS Art & Music in the Park. Kearsney Abbey, 25 August 2018

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MEANDERINGS – Art & Music in the Park

Saturday 25 August 2018, 4:00 – 5:00 pm at Kearsney Abbey, Alkham Road, Dover, Kent CT16 3DZ

The event is part of the Arts Council England funded project Art in the Park: Kearsney interpreted. Led by Dover District Council and curated by Dover Arts Development, the project involves a series of residencies in which artists develop new works that are inspired by Kearsney Abbey and Russell Gardens. In my residency, I have built MEANDER (Spiegel im Spiegel im Spiegel)a mobile structure that explores different locations along the meandering culverts and ponds in the park. On the occasion of the public event, the Leon String Quartet will perform compositions and arrangements by Philip Glass, Eric Whitacre and Matthew Brown.

  1. String Quartet No. 2  Philip Glass (1983)
  2. Lux Aurumque Eric Whitacre (2000), arranged for string quartet by Matthew Brown
  3. Shri Ramachandra Kripalu Indian devotional song (16th Century), arranged by Matthew Brown
  4. Meanderings Matthew Brown (2018)

Leon String Quartet 

Art in the Park: Kearsney interpreted

Project Partners: Kearsney Parks // Dover District Council // DAD Dover Arts Development

Funded by: Arts Council England & Heritage Lottery Fund

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The making of MEANDER

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MEANDER (Spiegel im Spiegel im Spiegel) // Installation at Kearsney Abbey, Dover

Here a few impressions of the spatial installation I am building for my artist residency at Kearsney Parks in Dover. Entitled MEANDER (Spiegel im Spiegel im Spiegel) the structure consists of two looped lines and four mirrored planes. The two zigzag forms are three-dimensional inversions of each other, with the black object acting as the physical shadow of the white one. Four mirrored perspex planes are held by the structure in four different orientations. The diagonal positioning of the mirrors breaks the perfect symmetry of the perpendicular double-structure.

The ‘axiomatic structure’ (Rosalind Krauss, Sculpture in the Expanded Field, 1979) is devised as a peripatetic object. It will meander through Kearsney Abbey, exploring different locations along the River Dour, the culverts and ponds in the park. The mirrors will reflect the changing settings and the installation will be mirrored in the water in turn.

When designing the structure, I remembered Arvo Pärt’s composition Spiegel im Spiegel (1978) and Morton Feldman’s Crippled Symmetry (1983) and decided to combine the inauguration event for the sculpture with a musical performance in the park. More information about the forthcoming concert in a next post. For now, here some images from the making-of phase of MEANDER.

 

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MEANDER (Spiegel im Spiegel im Spiegel)

Painted timber and mirrored Perspex, 88 cm x 44 cm x 396 cm

Gabor Stark, 2018

Art in the Park: Kearsney interpreted

Project Partners: Kearsney Parks // Dover District Council // DAD Dover Arts Development

Funded by: Arts Council England & Heritage Lottery Fund

 

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Artist Residency at Kearsney Parks, Dover

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I’m delighted to take up an artist residency at Kearsney Parks in Dover this summer. The residency is part of Art in the Park: Kearsney interpreted, an Arts Council England funded project in Kearsney Abbey and Russell Gardens. Organised by Dover District Council and DAD Dover Arts Development, the project aims to engage people through arts and culture and to bring new audiences to the parks. It involves a series of artist residencies, public events and a Park Bench poetry, painting and drawing project initiated and curated by Joanna Jones.

Following on from my portable Space Standards, I am planning to continue my investigation into peripatetic axiomatic structures. Above and below a few first collages of meandering white lines meandering through the park.

Kearsney Meanders, Gabor Stark, 2018

Art in the Park: Kearsney interpreted

Project Partners: Kearsney Parks // Dover District Council // DAD Dover Arts Development

Residency artists: Kate Beaugie // Joseph Black // Drew Burrett // Alma Tischler Wood // Jamie Jenkinson // Phil Saunders // Clare Smith // Gabor Stark // Louise Webb // Lisa Derand

Funded by: Arts Council England & Heritage Lottery Fund

 

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SPACE STANDARDS // CHALKUP21 Art & Architecture Walk

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“A drawing is simply a line going for a walk”

Paul Klee

 

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CHALKUP21 Art & Architecture Walk // Saturday 09 June 2018 // led by Gabor Stark

 

Here a few impressions of the spatial practice walk I led from Dover to St. Margaret’s Bay last week. I was invited by Dover Arts Development to orchestrate the event as part of the CHALKUP21 project, a new 21st-century architectural coastal trail that aspires to raise awareness and appreciation of contemporary art and architecture along the Strait of Dover. Linking together nine selected buildings and public artworks into a 17-mile coastal trail, the project focuses on contemporary art and architecture and aims to inspire a range of creative responses through video, photography, drawing and poetry.

On Saturday 9th June 2018 a group of 16 wayfarers joined me for a spatial practice promenade from Dover to St. Margaret’s Bay. Additional to visiting selected buildings and public artworks along the CHALKUP21 trail, participants were invited to actively engage with Dover’s built environment: to ‘do’ art and architecture, and to ‘perform’ and to intervene in space, albeit only fleetingly.

Inspired by Paul Klee’s aphorism that ‘a drawing is simply a line going for a walk’, I devised a family of seven portable linear constructions to accompany the walk. The eponymous Space Standards are designed as ‘axiomatic structures’ (Rosalind Krauss: Sculpture in the Expanded Field, 1979). Of identical line weight, the seven objects present all possible permutations of how to configure two timber sections perpendicularly on the top of a T-shaped pole. Self-evident and referring to nothing else than their intrinsic geometric and material properties, the seven artefacts are designed as abstract (en)signs that can be interpreted and used in multiple ways: as viewing frames, sculptural yardsticks, portable semaphores and three-dimensional drawing tools.

The international group of standard bearers hailed from England, Germany, Jordan, Taiwan and the United States. Together we took measures across Dover’s urban, infrastructural and coastal landscape and produced transitory spatial drawings of potential architectures along the way.

 

 

Standard bearers, co-walkers & fellow photographers

Alanoud Al-Radaideh // Alice Bryant // Danny Budzak // Yi-Peng Peppy Cheng // Philip Hutton // Joanna Jones // Kristina Kotov // Emilio Koutsoftides // Alf Löhr // Peter Morton // Declan Ralph // Petra Riemenschneider // Ines-Ulrike Rudolph // Daniel Stilwell // Ozan Topsogut // Nicola von Skepsgardh-Löhr

Itinerary

  • Start: Dover Priory Station
  • Site of the former Burlington House (1972 / demolished 2015)
  • Start/Finish Line (2011), designed by Alma Tischler Wood
  • Three Waves (2009), designed by Tonkin Liu Architects
  • Dover Sea Sports Centre (2010), designed by John Haynes & Simons Design Ltd
  • East Cliff / Port Of Dover Eastern Docks
  • Dover Totems (2017), designed by Elaine Tribley
  • White Cliffs Visitor Centre (1999), designed by Van Heyningen and Haward Architects
  • South Foreland Lighthouse (1793)
  • The Pines Calyx (2006), designed by Helionix Designs
  • Finish: The Coastguard seafront pub, St. Margaret’s Bay

 

CHALKUP21 // Another DAD project

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